Drawing Memories was directed originally by Takashi Sakurai.
This video describes Ian and his process of art. He creates highly realistic, photgraphic art. He uses photographs that intrigue him, and hold meaning for him. He describes how he creates his work. The video presents Ian as he works on his art works, he must use a magnifying glass, and has extreme patience as well as focus. The artwork in this video is part of the Farhat Art Museum.

 

 

 

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Ian Everard’s Photorealism Paintings , Farhat Art Museum Collection

 

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In Camera/Work in Progress was an exhibition at Cabrillo Gallery, Santa Cruz, California in 2006.

This exhibit was an attempt to represent a room – my studio – a place of ideas and possibility, of flux and flow and, above all, work. It was an invitation to enter a chamber, lit from within – a Camera Lucida – inside which I make measured paintings, often using a lens, as Roland Barthes describes, “one eye on the model, the other on the paper”.

Compared to more traditional forms of presentation that tend to contain individual pieces, the representation of the studio with much of its contents, gives access to a larger field of related work – the work in progress. The work is not one thing; it is the gradual accumulation of many things. In the studio, the accumulations are apparent – all the stuff that is the work, that might become the work, that informs the work – it’s all about potential. When I’m in the studio I’m not just painting, I’m observing myself painting. The studio contains objects that might be subjects – some already are subjects, some may be discarded, some completed and some left incomplete.

Video by Robin Kandel

 

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‘SECRETSECRET/Work in Progress’ – video projection, 2008.

“In all the Library there are no two identical books” ~ Jorge Luis Borges.

Dear Viewer,

You look over my shoulder while I work. I peer through my magnifying lamp, contemplating secrets. I tell you that I consider this work illumination – the technique is ancient but the copying of texts and images continues.

This work was inspired by finding two identical books, entitled SECRET.

 

 

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Suggestion Three and Suggestion Two

12, 11, 10. On the count of 9….. Your visits are routine. You keep coming back for more. This is your ninth visit. Winter approaches. The shadows are long. You can observe the progress. The artist sits at his desk, peering through his magnifying lens. He may be aware of you. You cannot be sure. He seems to be speaking or, at any rate, you are somehow aware of his thoughts. He’s thinking, “It all begins with a simple choice, I’ll paint this. The focus is on this one thing but there are layers beneath. At this moment, I am painting, observing, making a copy of a copy of a book on hypnotism. I am looking at the surface, trying to paint everything I see. The paintings are very precise but, let’s face it, inaccurate. Every detail seems captured but, for all that, the meaning is somehow unstable. The outward appearance of the book is the focus but the concentrated gaze through the lens seems to penetrate inward. As the surface is observed, it seems to dissolve. There are layers and layers beneath the surface. It is the labyrinth of the visible. As my eye wanders over the surface, my mind wanders too. Other images come to mind. I might be painting a book such as Post Hypnotic Suggestion……

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Suggestion Three and Suggestion Two

Perhaps it begins with a count down: 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4. On the count of 3…..Your visits are now routine. This is the real beginning. You might think spring is here. But you are indoors. You are in the artist’s studio. You can observe the progress. The artist sits at his desk, peering through his magnifying lens. He may be aware of you. You cannot be sure. He seems to be speaking or, at any rate, you are somehow aware of his thoughts. Perhaps he’s thinking, “It all begins with a simple choice, I’ll paint this. I am focusing on this one thing but there are layers beneath. At this moment, I am painting, observing, making a copy of a copy of a book on hypnotism. And this is the third copy. I am looking at the surface, trying to paint everything I see. The paintings are very precise but, under this magnification, inaccurate. I may not even finish. Every detail is observed but, for all that, it’s somehow unstable. The outward appearance of the book is the focus, but the concentrated gaze through the lens seems to penetrate inward. As the surface is observed, it seems to dissolve. There are layers and layers beneath the surface. It is the labyrinth of the visible. As the eye wanders over the surface, so does the mind. Other images appear – resemblances, recognitions, associations. The face on the cover seems like a famous actress of the era. The resemblance might prompt people to buy my book, thought the hypnotist, as he prepared the book for publication. This edition is from 1953. How many people on Wilshire Boulevard in 1953 resembled famous film stars? Perhaps someone who resembled a famous actress acquired this particular copy in 1953 – the year of my birth. She read Chapter 1 – What Every Hypnotist Should Know; Chapter 2 – Psychological Approach and Technique; Chapter 3 – You Can Hypnotize Anyone; Chapter 4 – Advanced Methods; Chapter 5 – Eight Oriental Techniques for Inducing ‘Deep Hypnosis’. She may have put what she learned into practice, thereby reversing roles. The subject was assumed to be female. Forgive me, but did she change the subject, do you think? Assumptions do change, after all. Perhaps, feeling empowered, she passed the book into other hands. We can wonder all we will, but we can be sure that many hands have touched this book on its subsequent journey from hand to hand, shelf to shelf – in yard sales, estate sales, flea markets and so on. Eventually it appeared in my hands while working at the used bookstore, where its original exchange value has tripled from one dollar to three. It is one among many. I have acquired every copy I can. I put up flyers for the buyers at the bookstore in the hope of obtaining more. A woman came in to the store to sell a copy. But, having seen my flyer, she declined the offer, saying she knew for a fact that she could get fifty dollars for this desirable book. I still search for copies. I predicted that I could easily acquire twelve but this was not borne out. So I am thinking about similar books – books that resemble other books.

 

 

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 Everard – “Twelve Suggestions”

“Twelve Suggestions” was an exhibition by Ian Everard at Sherry Frumkin Gallery in Santa Monica (2010).

In the installation, twelve tables were placed in the gallery, each with a book on hypnotism and a painting of the book. Videographer, Chris Casady recorded Everard, in the gallery, sitting at his desk, painting a watercolor copy of a hypnotic book. Like the artist, the exhibition itself examined the hypnotic image through magnifying lamps suggesting resemblances, associations and worlds within and without – the labyrinth of the visible.

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